SIX BOOKS

OF THE

COMMONWEALTH

(Les Six livres de la République)

by JEAN BODIN

Abridged and translated by M. J. TOOLEY

[Published 1955. No copyright asserted.]

BASIL BLACKWELL OXFORD

PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN
IN THE CITY OF OXFORD
AT THE ALDEN PRESS
BOUND BY THE KEMP HALL BINDERY, OXFORD


CONTENTS

HTML Version Text Version  INTRODUCTION    
    I. Biographical Sketch.    
    II. The Argument of the Six books of the Commonwealth.    
  TRANSLATOR'S NOTE.      
  BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE.      
  THE SIX BOOKS OF THE COMMONWEALTH.
[The chapter numbers in brackets are those of the original French.]    
 
HTML Version Text Version  BOOK I      
    The final end of the well-ordered commonwealth [Chapter I] 1
    Concerning the family [Chapters II-V] 6
    Concerning the citizen [Chapters VI and VII] 18
    Concerning sovereignty [Chapter VIII] 25
    Concerning feudatory and tributary princes [Chapter IX] 36
    The true attributes of sovereignty [Chapter X] 40
HTML Version Text Version  BOOK II      
    Of the different kinds of commonwealth [Chapter I] 51
    Concerning despotic monarchy [Chapter II] 56
    Concerning royal monarchy [Chapter III] 59
    Concerning tyrannical monarchy [Chapters IV and V] 61
    Concerning the aristocratic state [Chapter VI] 69
    Concerning popular states [Chapter VII] 72
HTML Version Text Version  BOOK III      
    The council [Chapter I] 77
    Officers of state and holders of commissions [Chapters II and III] 80
    The magistrate [Chapters IV and V] 84
    Concerning corporate associations, guilds, estates, and communities [Chapter VII] 96
HTML Version Text Version  BOOK IV      
    The rise and fall of commonwealths [Chapter I] 109
    That changes of government and changes in law should not be sudden [Chapter III] 123
    Whether the tenure of office in the commonwealth should be permanent [Chapter IV] 128
    Whether the prince should render justice to his subjects in person [Chapter VI] 133
    How seditions may be avoided [Chapter VII] 138
HTML Version Text Version  BOOK V      
    The order to be observed in adapting the form of the commonwealth to divers conditions of men, and the means of determining their dispositions [Chapter I]  
    How to prevent those disorders which spring from excessive wealth and excessive poverty [Chapter II]  
    Concerning rewards and punishments [Chapter IV]  
    Whether it is expedient to arm subjects, fortify and organize for war [Chapter V]  
    The keeping of treaties and alliances between princes [Chapter VI]  
HTML Version Text Version  BOOK VI      
    The census and the censorship [Chapter I]  
    The revenues [Chapter II]  
    A comparison of the three legitimate types of commonwealth, popular, aristocratic, and monarchical, concluding in favour of monarchy [Chapter IV]  
    That in a royal monarchy succession should not be by election nor in the female line, but by hereditary succession in the male line [Chapter V]  
    Concerning distributive, commutative, and harmonic justice, and their relation to the aristocratic, popular, and monarchical states [Chapter VI]  

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