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THE JOHN DOE TIMES
Volume IV, No. 12
3 March 1997

    IN THIS ISSUE:

  • ** KEHOE TRAVELING CIRCUS STILL ON LAM; FBI CLUELESS IN SPOKANE (STILL)
  • ** McCURTAIN GAZETTE STATEMENT ON DALLAS MORNING NEWS LIES
  • ** DALLAS MORNING NEWS: "WE DID NOTHING WRONG AND WE WON'T DO IT AGAIN."
  • ** STEPHEN JONES SEZ: "DMN STOLE MY FILES!"
  • ** INTERESTING TIDBIT: DMN REPORTER'S NAME IS PETE SLOVER & THERE IS SAID TO BE A SPECIAL AGENT SLOVER IN THE DALLAS ATF OFFICE-- ANY RELATION?

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The John Doe Times is an on-line, electronic newsletter published by the 1st Alabama Cavalry Regiment (Constitutional Militia) and friends. Our motto: Sic Semper Rodentia!

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KEHOE TRAVELING CIRCUS STILL ON LAM; FBI STILL CLUELESS IN SPOKANE

HAS ANYONE CHECKED TO SEE IF THERE'S A MOTEL SIX IN VANCOUVER?

"YOU TELL ME," SEZ OHIO HIGHWAY PATROL.

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John Doe Times Editorial Note: Same-old, same-old on the search for the Kehoe Boys and their Traveling Nazi Polygamist Circus. The only reason we reprint the article below is for the priceless quote from the Ohio Highway Patrol in paragraph eleven.........

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The Columbus Dispatch
2 March 1997
FUGITIVE'S VEHICLE FOUND IN WYOMING

Police say it is not a fresh lead in the hunt for the shootout suspects.

By Rita Price.

Two fugitive brothers wanted for their roles in shootouts with law enforcement officers in Wilmington, Ohio, have left behind a motor home and a trail that turns cold in Wyoming.

Authorities reported no signs of Chevie and Cheyne Kehoe as FBI agents prepared to search an abandoned 1977 Dodge Executive motor home found arounbd 5:15 p.m. beneath an I-25 overpass about 15 miles north of Casper, Wyoming.

Wyoming Highway Patrol spokesman Perrin Truel said the vehicle has Montana license plates registered to Karena Gumm, 23, wife of fugitive Chevie Kehoe, 24.

Chevie and Cheyne, 20, of Colville, Wash., have been the subjects of a nationwide manhunt since shortly after Feb. 15, when they fired on law enforcement officers in Wilmington. One bystander was injured in the incident, which was captured on videotape.

Truel said the motor home adandonment is not a fresh lead.

"A rancher who lived in the area had seen it sitting there for about a week," he said.

A Wyoming trooper spotted it Friday and alerted other authorities, Truel said.

"It was in a place where it would not be easily visible," Wyoming patrol Lt. Mike Dayton said. "It was all curtained, and we couldn't tell if anyone was in it."

Authorities had begun searching for the white and green motor home after the shooting, when suspects identified as the Kehoes abandoned their other vehicle, a 1977 Chevrolet Suburban, loaded with guns, ammunition, bulletproof vests and gear with FBI and police logos.

"We don't know if they were traveling all together or if they split up," Ohio Highway Patrol Sgt. John Born said yesterday. "I don't know of any specific sightings that we've been able to confirm."

Asked how such a conspicuous, wanted vehicle could make it across the country without detection, Born answered, "You tell me."

The Kehoes may be traveling with their wives and four young children, authorities say.

Both Kehoes are named in a 16-count indictment out of Clinton County that charges them with the attempted murder of a law enforcement officer.

Chevie Kehoe also has been indicted on three counts of federal firearms violations.

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McCURTAIN GAZETTE RESPONDS TO ALLEGATIONS THAT J.D.CASH WAS SOURCE FOR DALLAS MORNING NEWS "STORY"

McCurtain Gazette
107 South Central
P.O.Box 179
Idabel, OK 74745
(405) 288-3321

PRESS RELEASE, MARCH 1, 1997:

As a result of numerous inquiries concerning a Dallas Morning News article and comments made Friday night by Stephen Jones, the McCurtain Daily Gazette wishes to flatly deny that reporter J.D.Cash or any member of the news staff has even the slightest knowledge of how the Dallas Morning News came into possession of the information it relied on to print a story based upon documents that are clearly a hoax.

Members of the press have told Cash that his name has been floated in Denver as the purported intermediary who set up the Dallas newspaper. That is simply not the case.

We are familiar with the documents referred to in the Dallas Morning News accounts published today and we are also familiar with why they were created.

It has long been our understanding that the contents of that document are a mixture of fact and fantasy-- purposely and skillfully created so as to allow a member of the McVeigh defense team the opportunity to gain access and information from a single source in their complex and sprawling investigation.

A clear reading of the document by anyone familiar with the intimate details of the Oklahoma City bombing indicates that the vast majority of the contents of the document are concocted, and tthat it should therefore be wholly discounted.

We find it incredible and mystifying that the details from this carefully crafted, but obviously misleading document, could show up on the front page of a national newspaper of the stature of the Dallas Morning News.

We also wish to state in the strongest terms that we know of no legimate document in the possession of the Jones-McVeigh defense team which reflects accurate statements made by Timothy McVeigh professing his guilt in the Oklahoma City bombing.

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DMN SEZ: "We Did Nothing Wrong and We Won't Do It Again."

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Paper To Lay Low on McVeigh

The Associated Press

DENVER (AP) - The newspaper that published a purported confession by Oklahoma City bombing defendant Timothy McVeigh says it won't put out any more material from the documents it obtained.

The Dallas Morning News on Friday cited a defense team memorandum that said McVeigh admitted to driving the explosives-laden truck that demolished the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in April 1995. It said he chose a daytime attack to ensure a ``body count.''

The bombing killed 168 people and injured more than 500. McVeigh's trial is to begin later this month in federal court here.

Morning News executives said Sunday they will file a statement with in court today saying they would not report any more information ``from material used as the source of the previous articles.''

The newspaper said the court would be told that the paper ``remains sensitive to the tension between Mr. McVeigh's fair trial rights and the national public interest in this case.''

Morning News Editor Ralph Langer said the statement is to answer concerns about disrupting the trial. He said the information already published by the newspaper was of overriding public significance, but ``any further articles based on the defense reports would not rise to the same level of importance.''

All copies of the materials were turned over to the newspaper's attorneys for safekeeping, the paper said.

Stephen Jones, a lawyer for McVeigh, said the paper refused to give him a copy of the memo.

``I don't know everything that The Dallas Morning News knows, but this is not a legitimate defense memorandum, and I don't know exactly how they obtained it,'' Jones told ABC's ``This Week'' on Sunday.

``But I have a pretty good idea this morning and we will be going to the court to inform the judge of what we know.''

Jones had said Friday that he thought the material was a hoax perpetrated by someone with ``a reason to dislike the newspaper, and the source has, in my opinion, used an intermediary and set this newspaper up.''

Langer told the NBC ``Today'' show today that the paper ``researched this story carefully and obviously would not run a story that it was not confident of its information and sources and research and reporting.''

``We didn't publish until we had gone through all that process.''

McVeigh's trial, scheduled to begin March 31, was moved from Oklahoma City to Denver because of pretrial publicity. Jones had threatened to seek to have the trial moved to Alaska or Hawaii if there are more reports that refer to confidential documents.

Jones said he cannot say whether the newspaper's report is true because of U.S. District Judge Richard Matsch's gag order and his own code of professional responsibility.

``So the only way that I can tell you an answer to that question is to say, `One, Mr. McVeigh has pled not guilty, and two, the defense will not present a false defense,''' Jones said.

Langer said the paper's editors debated at length about what to do with the story and decided it needed to be published.

Larry Pozner, vice president of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, disagreed. He said the McVeigh conversation, if it took place, is protected by attorney-client privilege.

As for the memo, Pozner said, ``The only way you could have it, if it exists, is through a violation of some other citizen's rights.''

Sam Archibald, a retired professor of journalism at the University of Colorado, said the newspaper was obliged to print the story.

``If an editor decides the documents are valid he or she should publish it,'' he said. ``Editors are not in the business of withholding information. They are in the business of publishing.''

AP-NY-03-03-97 0807EST

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"DMN STOLE MY FILES" SEZ JONES.

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By Judith Crosson

DENVER (Reuter) - The chief lawyer for alleged Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh accused the Dallas Morning News Monday of breaking into the defense's computer system to steal confidential documents that made it appear the Gulf War veteran confessed to the bombing.

Lawyer Stephen Jones insisted the document used by the News as the basis for a story claiming McVeigh had confessed was not a confession or a ``legitimate defense document at all'' and said the paper deserved to be prosecuted for theft.

He added that a gag order placed on lawyers in the case prevented him from going into detail about what the document was and how it was prepared. But he appeared to have withdrawn his original charge that it was a hoax.

Paul Watler, an attorney for the Dallas paper, said the Morning News did not break into the defense team's computers or assist anyone else in doing so. ``The information upon which it based its articles over the weekend was obtained lawfully and through routine newsgathering techniques,'' Watler said.

A total of 168 people were killed in the April 19, 1995, bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah federal building in what has been described as the worst act of terrorism on U.S. soil.

Jones was in an angry mood when he addressed reporters three days after the newspaper used its web site on the Internet to report that McVeigh had allegedly confessed to planting the bomb and had done it in daytime to get a ``body count'' that would send a strong message to the government.

The lawyer said, ``It is not true that the First Amendment authorizes freedom of the press based upon documents stolen by the people who seek to publish them.''

He added, ``It isn't a confession by Tim McVeigh. It wasn't then. It isn't now.''

Jones did not say exactly how the documents had been stolen other than by breaking into the defense team's computer. More than 25,000 documents, including files belonging to McVeigh's co-defendant Terry Nichols, were also stolen, Jones said.

Jones said he did not know yet if he would seek a change of venue from Denver or seek a 90-day delay to the March 31 start of the trial. The trial was moved to Denver because of concerns that neither man could receive a fair trial in Oklahoma City.

``A lot will depend on the next 24 to 48 hours,'' he said. On Monday, the Dallas Morning News said it would publish no new articles based on confidential defense documents.

Jones said that on Sunday he told Patrick Ryan, the U.S. attorney in Oklahoma City, that the newspaper had obtained the material illegally. He said he would also file under seal a report with the bombing trial judge Richard Matsch.

Jones said thousands of confidential documents had been stolen, including copies of Federal Bureau of Investigation reports on interviews.

Jones said he is still concerned about the security of the defense files and that an investigator had been appointed to talk with all members of the defense team.

``Even I will be called upon to make statements to him,'' Jones said. He declined to identify who is conducting the probe.

Jones said the stolen documents contained information about former CIA employees and national intelligence data. The defense has suggested that international terrorists may have been behind the bombing.

16:28 03-03-97

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MORE ON DMN MELTDOWN....

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JONES WANTS REPORTER/LAWYER DISBARRED.

The Associated Press

By STEVEN K. PAULSON

DENVER (AP) - Timothy McVeigh's lawyer demanded an investigation Monday of The Dallas Morning News, accusing the newspaper of stealing hundreds of files from his computer, including a purported confession from the Oklahoma City bombing defendant.

Stephen Jones, while denying that the statement was in fact a confession, said: ``There is no justification whatever for this criminal act.''

Morning News lawyer Paul Watler said the newspaper ``met the highest ethical standards.''

``We did not break any laws,'' he said. ``We have no fear of criminal repercussions.''

Jones said that the newspaper broke into the defense's computer files and obtained hundreds of documents for McVeigh and co-defendant Terry Nichols, as well as 25,000 FBI files. Jones offered no proof that theft was committed.

In a story the newspaper published online Friday - the deadline for 1,000 potential jurors to respond to a court questionnaire - the newspaper cited what it said was a defense memorandum that said McVeigh admitted to driving the explosives-laden truck that demolished the Oklahoma City federal building in April 1995. The memo said he chose a daytime attack to ensure a ``body count.''

``It is not a legitimate defense memorandum,'' Jones said. ``It is not a confession of Tim McVeigh.''

Asked about Jones' demand for an investigation, U.S. Justice Department spokeswoman Leesa Brown said, ``Right now we have not received anything formally from him.''

Jones said he is considering asking for a 90-day delay in the trial as a ``cooling-off period.'' He also said he would seek to have the trial moved if the newspaper published any more stories from the documents.

He also said he would file a complaint with the Texas Supreme Court asking for an investigation into whether the reporter, Pete Slover, who is also a lawyer, should be disbarred.

Before Jones' news conference, Morning News executives filed a statement in court saying they would not report any more information ``from material used as the source of the previous articles.''

The newspaper said it ``remains sensitive to the tension between Mr. McVeigh's fair trial rights and the national public interest in this case.''

Editor Ralph Langer said the statement was in answer to concerns about disrupting the trial. He said the information already published by the newspaper was of overriding public significance, but ``any further articles based on the defense reports would not rise to the same level of importance.''

All copies of the materials were turned over to the newspaper's lawyers for safekeeping, the Morning News said. Jones demanded that the documents be returned, saying they belong to the U.S. government.

On Friday, Jones said he thought the material was a hoax perpetrated by someone trying to ``set this newspaper up.''

AP-NY-03-03-97 1738EST

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