42. HOUSEHOLD EXPENSE ROLL (1210)[1]

Sunday, at Clarendon. In harness bought for the lord king's use both in the great stable and in the stable of the chamber by Walter de Saint-Ouen and Nicholas of Wells, of which the particulars are endorsed on the roll, 41s. 9d. To William of London, messenger of the lord bishop of Norwich, going to his lord, 5s., by William Brewer. Item, in alms to a hundred poor people, whom the king fed because he ate twice on Friday next after the feast of the Holy Trinity at Knappe, 9s. 4d. Item, in alms to a hundred poor people because he ate twice on Friday next before the feast of St. John the Baptist, 9s. 4d. Item, in alms to a hundred poor people because he ate twice on Friday next after the feast of St. John the Baptist, 9s. 4d., paid to Brother Thomas. Item, at the same place, in a gift to William Le Pugneur, knight, 3m., by the king....

On Tuesday next after the feast of All Saints, at Nottingham. To William the ewerer,[2] who has d. a day for 140 days — that is to say, from June 18 to November 4, both being counted — 5s. 10d. To the same William for a bath of the lord king taken at Marlborough, 5d.; for a second bath at Nottingham, 5d., for a third bath at Northampton, 5d.; for a fourth bath at Gloucester, 5d. Item, at the same place, in expenses of Adam and Gervaise, carters of the chamber, and of the man of Thomas the Marshal, and of two surnptermen with five cart-horses, two pack-horses, and a rouncey of Thomas the Marshal, staying with the wardrobe at Northampton and Rockingham for six days by the king's precept, while the lord king made a trip through the forests and river preserves, 18s. Item, in shoeing the said horses and in litter [for them] at Maldon, 4d., paid to Thomas the Marshal....

On Thursday next after the feast of the Conception of the Blessed Mary, at Bristol, we paid to Engelard, sheriff of Gloucester, 400 to be put in the king's treasury....

On the next Sunday, in the same place. In a gift to Walter de Marc, 5s., by the king. In a fur of vair[3] for trimming the tunic of the lord king, 20s. In gris for certain sleeves of the lord king, 9d. To a certain messenger going to the bishop of Winchester with letters concerning rumours about the Roman emperor, 3d. To Roger of the Tower going to Hugh de Neville with letters concerning the same, 3d. In two dozen [sheets of] parchment for making rolls concerning the bishoprics, 18d....

On Sunday next before the [feast of the] Chair of St. Peter, at St. Bridget. In small expenses of Henry, son of the duke of Saxony, 20s., paid to Hugh of Barnwell by the king. In parchment at the same place, 9d. On the same day, in repairs of the lord king's leggings furred with gris, 8d.... In a sack of cordovan to hold the lord king's robe, 7s. In four pairs of boots furred with lamb for the use of the lord king, 7s. 8d. In one pair of cowhide hose for the use of the lord king, 3s. In furbishing two swords of the lord king, 22d. In four pairs of iron spurs for the use of the same, 16d.... In a strap for the sword of the lord king, 8d....

On Monday, [the feast of] the Chair of St. Peter, at Tweedmouth. To Philip of Stradley, for buying a horse, 2m., by the king. In a fur of gris bought at Winchester for the lord king's overtunic [in which] to get up during the night, 20s., by the hand of William the Tailor....

(Latin) Rotuli de Liberate ac de Misis, pp. 117-51.


[1] This is the oldest of the mise rolls, which anticipate the daily account-books of the later wardrobe; see Tout, Chapters in Mediaeval Administrative History, I, 44 f.

[2] See above, p. 69, n. 22.

[3] Vair and gris were two very popular kinds of fur: the former was grey and white, the latter grey.


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